NINDS Welcomes New Class of Summer Students
Watch ideas light up a fish’s brain
Found in Translation
An MRI scan of a human brain highlighting the dural lymphatic system
Studies of epilepsy patients led by Kareem Zaghloul, M.D., Ph.D., a neurosurgeon-researcher and head of the Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery Unit, uncover clues to how the brain stores and retrieves memories
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NINDS Welcomes New Class of Summer Students

Each year, NINDS offers hands-on research training in brain and nervous system research to hundreds of students through its Summer Internship Program (SIP). This year, NINDS officially welcomed the 2017 class at an orientation on June 29. Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

Watch ideas light up a fish’s brain

A team led by Kevin Briggman is recording the activity of tens of thousands of individual neurons and preparing to create a sort of wiring diagram, a map that shows each cellular connection at the synapse. Such a map is known as a connectome. The goal is to ultimately create a comprehensive atlas of the fish brain — in unprecedented detail. This requires a full reconstruction of every synapse and every vesicle of every individual neuron, along with a recording of the brain’s activity as the fish hunts for food. Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

Found in Translation

When asked about the goals of her research, Bibiana Bielekova, M.D., doesn’t mince words: “We want to understand multiple sclerosis so that we can cure it.” A progressive neurodegenerative disease, multiple sclerosis presents several mysteries for researchers to solve. “We do know that the immune system plays a role in the disease,” explained Bielekova, “but we don’t know the targets in the brain or the mechanisms of attack.” Furthermore, the immune system is not simply the culprit in multiple sclerosis; inflammation also appears to play a role in repair of the nervous system. Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

NIH researchers uncover drain pipes in our brains

Dr. Daniel Reich, a neuroradiologist and Senior Investigator at the NINDS, and his team used MRI to provide evidence of the body’s waste system in the human brain. By scanning the brains of healthy volunteers, researchers at the National Institutes of Health saw the first, long-sought evidence that our brains may drain some waste out through lymphatic vessels, the body’s sewer system. The results further suggest the vessels could act as a pipeline between the brain and the immune system. Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

NIH scientists try to crack the brain’s memory codes

Studies of epilepsy patients led by Kareem Zaghloul, M.D., Ph.D., an NINDS neurosurgeon-researcher and head of the Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery Unit, uncover clues to how the brain stores and retrieves memories. One study suggests that the brain etches each memory into unique firing patterns of individual neurons. Meanwhile, the second study suggests that the brain replays memories faster than they are stored.  Learn More » Exit Disclaimer