NINDS Welcomes New Class of Summer Students
Graduate Student Annapurna Vemu and Dr. Roll-Mecak discuss plans for analyzing the dynamics of neuronal microtubules.
Found in Translation
An MRI scan of a human brain highlighting the dural lymphatic system
Studies of epilepsy patients led by Kareem Zaghloul, M.D., Ph.D., a neurosurgeon-researcher and head of the Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery Unit, uncover clues to how the brain stores and retrieves memories
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2017 NINDS Summer Students

Each year, NINDS offers hands-on research training in brain and nervous system research to hundreds of students through its Summer Internship Program (SIP). This year, NINDS officially welcomed the 2017 class at an orientation on June 29. Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

Cracking the Tubulin Code

Dr. Antonina Roll-Mecak examines how tubulin diversity might affect cell shape, movement, and recovery after injury.  To Understand how life works at such a basic level, people must learn the biophysical properties of microtubules that enable them to respond to cellular cues in real time.    Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

Disruption of the Blood-Brain Barrier in Patients at Risk for Vascular Dementia

Dr. Richard Leigh and colleagues in the Stroke Branch have identified a way to extract new information from old MRIs. The figure shows a typical MRI scan from a patient with vascular dementia. Superimposed in color is a blood-brain barrier (BBB) heat-map generated with a new MRI post-processing methodology. Using this approach, this recently published study identified a clear relationship between the integrity of the BBB measured on clinical MRI scans and the more traditional changes seen on MRI that are associated with vascular cognitive impairment. Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

NIH researchers uncover drain pipes in our brains

Dr. Daniel Reich, a neuroradiologist and Senior Investigator at the NINDS, and his team used MRI to provide evidence of the body’s waste system in the human brain. By scanning the brains of healthy volunteers, researchers at the National Institutes of Health saw the first, long-sought evidence that our brains may drain some waste out through lymphatic vessels, the body’s sewer system. The results further suggest the vessels could act as a pipeline between the brain and the immune system. Learn More » Exit Disclaimer

NIH scientists try to crack the brain’s memory codes

Studies of epilepsy patients led by Kareem Zaghloul, M.D., Ph.D., an NINDS neurosurgeon-researcher and head of the Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery Unit, uncover clues to how the brain stores and retrieves memories. One study suggests that the brain etches each memory into unique firing patterns of individual neurons. Meanwhile, the second study suggests that the brain replays memories faster than they are stored.  Learn More » Exit Disclaimer