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Investigator

Kareem Zaghloul, M.D., Ph.D.

Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery Unit


Building 10 Room 3D20
10 Center Drive
Bethesda MD 20892
Office: 301-594-8114
Lab: 301-594-0743
Fax: 301-402-0380
kareem.zaghloul@nih.gov

Dr. Zaghloul received his B.Sc. degree from MIT in 1995 and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003. His graduate work focused on developing silicon models of visual processing in the mammalian retina with Dr. Kwabena Boahen. Dr. Zaghloul completed a residency in Neurological Surgery in 2010 from the University of Pennsylvania. During this time, he completed postdoctoral research with Dr. Michael Kahana, investigating the neural correlates of human memory encoding, decision, and reward. Dr. Zaghloul has completed clinical fellowships in Epilepsy Surgery and in DBS Surgery. Dr. Zaghloul joined NINDS as a Staff Clinician in 2010, and as an Investigator in 2013. His laboratory is focused on investigating the neural mechanisms underlying human cognitive function.

​Our lab exploits the unique investigative opportunities provided by intracranial electrical recordings during neurosurgical procedures. Using recordings captured from epilepsy patients implanted with subdural and depth electrodes, we investigate the activation of cortical networks during memory encoding and recall.And using the recordings captured during the implantation of deep brain stimulators, we investigate the role of the basal ganglia in learning and decision making.

Staff Image
  • Julio Chapeton, Ph.D.
    Postdoctoral Fellow

  • John Cocjin, B.Sc.
    Postbaccalaureate IRTA

  • Jason Hsieh, B.Sc.
    Research Fellow

  • Alex Vaz, B.Sc.
    Postbaccalaureate IRTA

  • Alex Vaz, B.Sc.
    Post baccalaureate IRTA Fellow

  • John Wittig, Ph.D.
    Postdoctoral Fellow

  • Robert Yaffe, B.Sc.
    Doctoral Student

  • Baltazar Zavala, B.Sc.
    Doctoral Student

  • 1) Baltazar A. Zavala, Huiling Tan, Simon Little, Keyoumars Ashkan, Marwan Hariz, Thomas Foltynie, Ludvic Zrinzo, Kareem A. Zaghloul, and Peter Brown (2014)
  • Midline Frontal Cortex Low-Frequency Activity Drives Subthalamic Nucleus Oscillations during Conflict
  • Journal of Neuroscience, 34, 7322-7333
  • 2) Robert B. Yaffe, Matthew S. D. Kerr, Srikanth Damera, Sridevi V. Sarma, Sara K. Inati, and Kareem A. Zaghloul (2014)
  • Reinstatement of distributed patterns of oscillatory power occurs with precise spatiotemporal dynamics during successful memory recall
  • PNAS, 111, 18727-18732
  • 3) Andrew I. Yang, Nora Vanegas, Codrin Lungu, and Kareem A. Zaghloul (2014)
  • Beta-Coupled High-Frequency Activity and Beta-Locked Neuronal Spiking in the Subthalamic Nucleus of Parkinson's Disease
  • Journal of Neuroscience, 34, 12816-12827
  • 4) Kareem A. Zaghloul*, John F. Burke* , Joshua Jacobs, Ryan B. Williams, Michael R. Sperling, Ashwini D. Sharan, and Michael J. Kahana (2013)
  • Synchronous and Asynchronous Theta and Gamma Activity during Episodic Memory Formation
  • Journal of Neuroscience, 33, 292-304
  • 5) Baltazar Zavala, John-Stuart Brittain, Ned Jenkinson, Keyoumars Ashkan, Thomas Foltynie, Patricia Limousin, Ludvic Zrinzo, Alexander L. Green, Tipu Aziz, Kareem Zaghloul, and Peter Brown (2013)
  • Subthalamic Nucleus Local Field Potential Activity during the Eriksen Flanker Task Reveals a Novel Role for Theta Phase during Conflict Monitoring
  • Journal of Neuroscience, 33, 14758-14766
  • 6) Kareem A. Zaghloul, Christoph T. Weidemann, Bradley C. Lega, Jurg L. Jaggi, Gordon H. Baltuch, and Michael J. Kahana (2012)
  • Neuronal Activity in the Human Subthalamic Nucleus Encodes Decision Conflict during Action Selection
  • Journal of Neuroscience, 32, 2453-2460
  • 7) Kareem A. Zaghloul, Justin A. Blanco, Christoph T. Weidemann, Kathryn McGill, Jurg L. Jaggi, Gordon H. Baltuch, Michael J. Kahana (2009)
  • Human Substantia Nigra Neurons Encode Unexpected Financial Rewards
  • Science, 323, 1496-1499
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