Neuroscience at HIH Home
NINDS Home NIMH Home NICHD Home NIDCD Home NEI Home NIDCR Home NIA Home NIAAA Home NIDA Home NHGRI Home NIEHS Home NCI Home
National Institutes of Health - Neuroscience at HIH Link to NIH
Link to About Us
Link to Faculty
Link to Areas of Research
Link to Seminars
Link to Interest Groups
Link to Post-doctoral Openings
Link to Home
 

Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., Senior Investigator

Dr. Drayna received his B.A. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin in 1976, and his PhD in Genetics from Harvard University in 1981. He did postdoctoral research at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salt Lake City, where he constructed the first full-length genetic map of a human chromosome (the X chromosome), and performed a number of disease gene linkage studies. He then spent 15 years in the San Francisco Bay area biotechnology industry, where he worked on genetic aspects of human genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism, and identified the gene responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder, that represents the most common disease gene in Caucasians. In 1996 Dr. Drayna moved to the NIDCD, where he pursues studies on the genetics of human communication disorders.
Photo of Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., Senior Investigator

Research Interests:
The Section on Systems Biology of Communication Disorders is focused on identifying genetic variation in the molecular components of human communication systems. Our primary tools are genetic linkage and positional cloning studies, used to identify genes responsible for communication disorders in humans, including disorders of auditory pitch recognition, deficits in the human sense of bitter taste, and the speech disorder of stuttering.


Contact Information:

Dr. Dennis Drayna
5 Research Court, Room 2B-46, Mail Stop 3320
Rockville, MD 20850-

Telephone: (301) 402-4930 (office), (301) 402-4930 (laboratory), (301) 827-9637 (fax)
Email: drayna@nidcd.nih.gov

top

Home   |   Email List   |   Search   |   Contact Us   |   Privacy Notice   |   Disclaimer   |   Accessibility
Comments or questions about the website?
Send email to neuroscience@nih.gov